Skip to content

Make Shell come clean in the Niger delta

July 7, 2009

 

Niger River Delta, aerial photograph. The delta has formed from sediments deposited by the Niger River. Amongst the many streams are mangrove forests. GEORGE STEINMETZ / SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Niger River Delta, aerial photograph. The delta has formed from sediments deposited by the Niger River. Amongst the many streams are mangrove forests. GEORGE STEINMETZ / SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Amnesty International is campaigning to get Shell to clean up its operations in the Niger Delta. It says: “Decades of pollution in the Niger Delta has led to serious human rights violations, driving the people of the region into poverty. The oil industry has failed to adequately prevent the human rights impacts of its operations in the Niger Delta.

“The Niger Delta is one of the 10 most important wetland and coastal marine ecosystems in the world and home to some 31 million people. It is also the location of massive oil deposits, which have been exploited for decades by the government of Nigeria and multinational oil companies. The people of the Niger Delta have seen their human rights undermined by oil companies that their government cannot or will not hold to account.

“Amnesty International is concerned about the devastating impact that pollution and environmental damage, associated with the operations of Shell, is having on the human rights of people in the Niger Delta.”

You can email the new Chief Executive of Shell to make a commitment to clean up Shell’s operation in the Niger Delta. And don’t think you can’t help – Amnesty’s Twitter campaign has already persuaded Shell to schedule a web debate on the subject. Someone is listening, so make yourself heard!

Dead mangrove forest. Dead mangrove trees lining a stream in Jones Creek in the Niger delta, Nigeria, Africa. The trees were killed by an oil spill that occurred in March 1998. The oil leaked from an ill- maintained 30 year old pipeline. It was two days before the oil company sent in a crew to contain the spill. GEORGE STEINMETZ / SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Dead mangrove forest. Dead mangrove trees lining a stream in Jones Creek in the Niger delta, Nigeria, Africa. The trees were killed by an oil spill that occurred in March 1998. The oil leaked from an ill- maintained 30 year old pipeline. It was two days before the oil company sent in a crew to contain the spill. GEORGE STEINMETZ / SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

The Science Photo Library has more pictures of the Niger Delta, including oil flow stations – if you’re interested.

Advertisements
No comments yet

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: